managing

I’m going to go ahead and change the number to a post-surgery day so I have a better idea what is going on. Surgery happened on Day 52 so if you want to calculate days since injury, just add that number.

Day 13 PS (see what I did there?)

Before surgery, I greedily read up all the blogs I could find on the internet about people commenting about ACL surgery. Well, that’s a lie. I greedily read up around 5-6 blogs before tiring and thinking that I’d be some sort of unique scientific case to whom all the common symptoms/recovery processes wouldn’t apply. Of course, this wasn’t true. But it was nice to think about it.

Anyhow, I’m digressing.

The common theme that I think should have been prevalent in all the blogs but wasn’t, possibly because of the attitude the writers were trying to present, is that at some point or another, you’re going to feel sorry for yourself. It’s inevitable. And the reason I say this is because I think the vast majority of people who tear their ACL and actually elect to have surgery are active. My (unscientific) thinking behind this is that:

(a) It’s kind of hard to tear your ACL while being non-active. It’s not something that you just pull. Considerable force must be at play.
(b) Surgery is recommended only if there are additional tears that have long-term effects (such as meniscii) or with people who are young and don’t want to change their lifestyle.

An ACL surgery makes you go from some amount of activeness to no amount of activeness. It sucks.

Personally, in the weeks following my injury I laid low from a fitness perspective. When I got injured, I was in the best shape of my life (which is not a huge compliment to my fitness regime, by the way, because there was still lots to improve). I was playing basketball about 3 times a week and running about 3 times a week. My vertical had improved by at least a few inches in the past few months and I was about an inch or 2 from touching rim… which, for a guy who barely hits 5’6″, was pretty exciting. All that changed in the matter of seconds.

Following my injury, my leg didn’t really permit me to engage in any form of exercise. Thankfully, the initial swelling finally subsided and I had the chance to dedicate some much needed time to my upper body. I swapped out my fitness regiment to basically lifting 3 times a week and additionally alternating between shoulder sets and arms sets on those days. Once my legs became stronger, I added some stationary bike and leg presses. I was losing lower body muscle but I was still relatively fit since my metabolism was higher whatwith all the resistance training.

In the two weeks since surgery, my only exercise has been my rehab exercises. And. It. Sucks. As a person who was trying to get more active and actually enjoys it, ACL tears and surgery sucks. It doesn’t make you depressed but it makes you pretty damn annoyed. I went from exercising 5-6 days a week to working out my upper body 3 times a week to spending most of my day with my leg raised on a couch watching TV. The metamorphosis is unreal. My body hasn’t caught up with me yet, but I’ve lost most of the muscle mass I gained over the last few weeks in the form of fat. I’m afraid if this continue for a few more weeks, I’ll start actually putting on pounds on top of those pounds I already need to lose.

Anyhow, the rambly nature of this post is basically trying to say: if you are going to get ACL surgery, prepare yourself for at least some point in time where you feel really shitty about the situation you are in. For me, I have so far experienced this in the lack of an active lifestyle. But I know that when basketball season starts, I’ll be absolutely aching to get back on the court to play the sport I love. And it’s going to kill me to know that I can’t play until I’ve healed up well enough. It sucks.

Okay, back to regularly scheduled programming. Today marked the third straight day of going to work for a full day and it was also the first day since I got prescribed the new painkillers that I didn’t take any. My appointment with the PT also went well and I was cleared to walk without crutches at home. The walking is still a little rickety but I have good gait. New exercises at PT included balancing on one leg (both my good leg and my bad leg) and walking on the treadmill at a very slow speed for about 5 minutes (no crutches). It’s definitely nice to see concrete progress. My unknown-units measure went up from about 74 last time to 120 today. So that was a huge leap.

I’m guessing I’ll be allowed to walk without crutches, but with the brace, sometime next week. The criteria for having to walk without a brace is to do a perfect straight leg raise. Right now, I’d say my knee has about 3-4 degrees of flexion when it’s the straightest I can get it. I need to get that to 0. Apparently the only way to do this is to do a lot of straight leg raises.

Today, I also found out that the thing I thought was a nail in my leg is actually a pin that will eventually dissolve away. This is good to hear because it would be pretty annoying to have a nail in my bone for the rest of my life. I have provided photos below for people who are not Facebook friends with me.

Anyhow, that’s it for this long, rambling post. The gist of it is that I’m struggling to come to grips with my temporarily new lifestyle. But the progress has been positive and hopefully I can get back to the way things were sooner rather than later.

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